Exploring Natural Antibiotics

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Exploring Natural Antibiotics

Protecting yourself against infection can be done naturally. But where do you begin?

Foremost, if you suspect you have an infection (you're coughing, expelling mucus, are feverish, etc.), now is not the time to experiment: You absolutely should be working with a holistic doctor to treat the infection.

If your current aim is to boost your body's natural protection against infection, a variety of herbs and essential oils, as well as good old soap and water, can do wonders. Use this brief overview as a starting point for an in-depth discussion with your natural health practitioner.

 

Food Extracts

Certain food extracts contain antibiotic properties. For example, cranberry extract is a useful remedy for urinary tract infection. Honey is one of the oldest known food-based antibiotics, dating back to ancient Egypt and Israel.

Herbal Extracts 

A variety of herbal extracts have antibiotic properties and are often used in tincture, capsule, powder (e.g., tea) form, depending on the herb and the intended use. Among the herbs are goldenseal, barberry, Oregon grape root, Echinacea, and Lomatium.

Essential Oils

Thyme, basil, tea tree, and eucalyptus oils have a variety of bug and germ fighting properties. Additionally, citrus fruit oils (lemon, lime, orange, bergamot) have health-protective benefits.
Note: Essential oils should never be consumed and should always be used in a diffuser or diluted with a base oil, such as almond oil.

Soap and Water

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The FDA has ruled that companies can no longer market "antibacterial soaps." The risks of adding chemicals, including triclosan, to washing products are greater than any protection when compared to regular soap and water.

How does soap help protect against bacteria? When you vigorously rub your hands and lather the soap, it loosens bacteria from the skin. Simple, effective, and all natural.

There are many natural remedies in addition to those listed, but many of them don't have a wide body of clinical research behind them yet. It may take time before medical science catches up with the long history of use documented in traditional medicine.

There is potential for drug-herb interaction, so it's important to work with a health practitioner who is well trained in the pharmaceutical properties of botanical products.

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